Original Link: http://daringfireball.net/2014/02/microsoft_past_and_future

In broad strokes, here is my view of Microsoft’s history.

In the beginning, Bill Gates stated the company’s goal: “A computer on every desk and in every home.”

That was crazy. The PC revolution was well underway, but the grand total of PCs sold when Gates stated that mantra was, by today’s standards, effectively zero. PCs were for hobbyists. Everyone involved knew they were on to something, but Gates realized, at the outset, that they were onto something huge. The industry was measuring sales in the thousands, but Gates was already thinking about billions.

John gives an interesting look at Microsoft’s past and where they are heading in relation to yesterday’s appointing of Satya Nadella as the new CEO.

Microsoft has been doing well with their Azure services, and Nadella’s background running that area just might be what Microsoft needs.

Further down in John’s post, he also mentioned this:

I think it’s a very good sign that Satya Nadella comes from Microsoft’s server group. As my colleague Brent Simmons wrote today:

Creating services for iOS apps doesn’t sound at all like the Microsoft I used to know. Using Node.js and JavaScript doesn’t sound like that Microsoft. The old Microsoft would create services for their OSes only and you’d have to use Visual Studio.

There’s still a lot of the old Microsoft there, the Windows, Office, Exchange, and Sharepoint (WOES) company. It’s most of the company by far, surely. (I just made up the acronym WOES. It fits.)

But in the Azure group, at least, there’s recognition that Microsoft can’t survive on lock-in, that those days are in the past.

Even if you don’t choose to use Microsoft’s cloud services, I hope you can agree on two things: that competition is good, and that Azure’s support-everything policy is the best direction for the future of the company.

In short, Nadella’s Server division is the one part of Microsoft that seems designed for, and part of, the post-iOS, post-Android state of the industry. A division pushing toward the future, not the past.

[..]

Satya Nadella needs to find Microsoft’s new “a computer on every desk and in every home running Microsoft software”. Here’s my stab at it:Microsoft services, sending data to and from every networked device in the world.

The next ubiquity isn’t running on every device, it’s talking to every device.

And I have to agree, Microsoft’s Azure service has been more successful of late than their desktop services, and are where they need to focus more on now.